Review: Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orïsha #1) – Tomi Adeyemi

children of blood and boneZélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope.

Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.

Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy.

***

“With her words, something clicks – a sign of the greater hand. We’ve been led to this moment, pushed in the tiniest, most obscure ways.”

Perhaps one of the most hyped books of 2018, Children of Blood and Bone is worth the acclaim and praise. It’s such a refreshing change of setting from the standard pseudo-medieval Western Europe which dominates the fantasy genre.

From the deities and the magic system to the physical locations, the food, the language, character appearances and clothing – it was richly descriptive, immersive experience of an African (more specifically, Nigerian)-inspired fantasy.

Yes, the author does use popular fantasy tropes, such as the “Chosen Ones” and hunt-for-the-magical-artefacts, but there is nothing inherently wrong with this. (I’ve seen reviews critiquing this, which is why I’m addressing it here.) These are just markers of the genre – it’s what you do with them that counts.

(Also, there is a problematic trend of allowing white writers a pass on this, but then as soon as POC writers do it, we claim it’s overdone/this particular subgenre is over. A discussion for another time, and I am probably not the most qualified person to explain it, but again worth mentioning in regards to this particular book.)

The short chapters made for quite a swift read, despite the length of the book. The high emotions of the characters reminds us of how young they are, facing political and magical obstacles; family and friend drama; potential matters of the heart and their own growing powers/involvement.

There were also unexpected moments of levity and humour – this particular exchange had me chuckling out loud:

“I guess the other night was my first time spending the night with a boy.”
Tzain snorts. “Was it everything you ever dreamed?”⠀
“I don’t know…” I press my finger to my lips. “I always imagined less bondage.”

(Above context – they were captured and tied up in a tent!)

Finally, the jaw-dropping ending upped the stakes, and certainly has readers like me hotly anticipating the 2019 sequel.

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